Taxonomy

Analysis of avian DNA, biometrics and vocalisations add to our understanding of bird species all the time. We cover all the 'splits', lumps and discoveries.

This Stone-Curlew on Lanzarote belongs to the sedentary subspecies <em>insularum</em> - but is it a new cryptic Canarian endemic, along with the stone-curlews on the rest of the archipelago? Photo: James Lowen.

Stone-curlew to be split?

A genetic study of the four recognised subspecies of Stone-curlew has found the current classification inaccurate, and that the two forms...

19/03/2015

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Glowing Puffleg giving a demonstration of how it got its English name. Photo: Keith Bowers (commons.wikimedia.org).

Hummingbirds a-gogo

New research has found that there were once, probably are, and almost certainly will be many more species of hummingbird than are known at...

14/04/2014

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Hooded Crow, like this bird in Jerusalem, Israel, could be merely a stable colour morph rather than the full species we currently believe it to be. Photo: SuperJew (commons.wikimedia.org).

Crows in black and white

A genetic survey of corvid museum specimens has revealed that crows readily switched plumage colours during their evolution, suggests new...

27/02/2014

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Scaly-breasted Wren-babbler, here photographed in Himachal Pradesh, India, was hiding a new species in the Chinese part of its range. Photo: J M Garg (commons.wikimedia.org).

Wren-babbler split

Analysis of the voice and genes of a Chinese mountain wren-babbler has indicated that there are two species present.

27/02/2014

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This newly re-christened Sagebrush Sparrow Fort Rock State Park, Oregon, has arisen as a result of the splits in Sage Sparrow. Photo: Innotata (commons.wikimedia.org).

AOU changes

A key split features in the American Ornithologists’ Union's latest round of taxonomic revisions, but other predicted changes have been put...

27/02/2014

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