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The Roaches, Staffordshire

Looking down from the Roaches Ridge to Well farm in the dip between Hen Cloud and Ramshaw Rocks - an area where cuckoo is often heard in May and June. The skyline is formed by Morridge and the former pub, the Mermaid, can be clearly seen. Not far from here, dotterel sometimes pay a visit on their migration north in late April to early May.

15 April 2017

Looking down from the Roaches Ridge to Well farm in the dip between Hen Cloud and Ramshaw Rocks - an area where cuckoo is often heard in May and June. The skyline is formed by Morridge and the former pub, the Mermaid, can be clearly seen. Not far from here, dotterel sometimes pay a visit on their migration north in late April to early May.
© (uploaded 15/04/17)

The Roaches, Staffordshire

The Roaches ridge above the steps leading up past the 'Second Tier', the higher line of crags. Do not bother to visit in the middle of the day on weekends and school holidays, especially during the summer or in very good weather - there are simply too many people around! At quieter times meadow pipits, red grouse, ravens, occasional cuckoos (in May and June) and a variety of raptors can be seen.

15 April 2017

The Roaches ridge above the steps leading up past the 'Second Tier', the higher line of crags. Do not bother to visit in the middle of the day on weekends and school holidays, especially during the summer or in very good weather - there are simply too many people around! At quieter times meadow pipits, red grouse, ravens, occasional cuckoos (in May and June) and a variety of raptors can be seen.
© (uploaded 15/04/17)

The Roaches, Staffordshire

The larch wood below the Roaches crags - a good place for summer warblers, including wood warbler at times. Chaffinch is also common and tawny owl often calls as dusk falls. Spotted flycatchers turn up in the summer, and in the late spring cuckoos occasionally fly through the wood on there way to the the open moorland beyond, where meadow pipits are common. The best parts of the wood are NW of the main climbing areas, where there is less disturbance.

15 April 2017

The larch wood below the Roaches crags - a good place for summer warblers, including wood warbler at times. Chaffinch is also common and tawny owl often calls as dusk falls. Spotted flycatchers turn up in the summer, and in the late spring cuckoos occasionally fly through the wood on there way to the the open moorland beyond, where meadow pipits are common. The best parts of the wood are NW of the main climbing areas, where there is less disturbance.
© (uploaded 15/04/17)

Holy Island, Northumberland

Sandham Bay, near the NE tip of Lindisfarne - an excellent place for waders either side of high tide. At the eastern end of the bay is Emmanuel Head which is perhaps the best place on the island for sea-watching with regular daily passage of gannets (often close in at high tide) for the summer half of the year. Also a good place to spot red-throated diver, long tailed ducks, terns, eiders, gulls, and even skuas at the right times of year.

15 April 2017

Sandham Bay, near the NE tip of Lindisfarne - an excellent place for waders either side of high tide. At the eastern end of the bay is Emmanuel Head which is perhaps the best place on the island for sea-watching with regular daily passage of gannets (often close in at high tide) for the summer half of the year. Also a good place to spot red-throated diver, long tailed ducks, terns, eiders, gulls, and even skuas at the right times of year.
© (uploaded 15/04/17)

Holy Island, Northumberland

Coves Haven, on the north shore of Lindisfarne - an excellent place to see waders in the hours before and after high tide, particularly in winter. Eiders are also common and fulmars nest in the cliffs at the eastern end of the bay.

15 April 2017

Coves Haven, on the north shore of Lindisfarne - an excellent place to see waders in the hours before and after high tide, particularly in winter. Eiders are also common and fulmars nest in the cliffs at the eastern end of the bay.
© (uploaded 15/04/17)

Humphrey Head, Cumbria

Humphrey Head Point, looking south east toward Heysham Power Station. Tidal mudflats and salt marsh. Little Egret and waders are common. The headland itself is a long hills with Carboniferous limestone always close to the surface. It is very exposed on the western side and along the summit ridge, with typical 'bent' trees. There is an area of old woodland on its eastern flank.

15 April 2017

Humphrey Head Point, looking south east toward Heysham Power Station. Tidal mudflats and salt marsh. Little Egret and waders are common. The headland itself is a long hills with Carboniferous limestone always close to the surface. It is very exposed on the western side and along the summit ridge, with typical 'bent' trees. There is an area of old woodland on its eastern flank.
© (uploaded 15/04/17)

Humphrey Head, Cumbria

Humphrey Head Point, looking south east toward Heysham Power Station. Tidal mudflats and salt marsh. Little Egret and waders are common.

15 April 2017

Humphrey Head Point, looking south east toward Heysham Power Station. Tidal mudflats and salt marsh. Little Egret and waders are common.
© (uploaded 15/04/17)

Silverdale Community CP, Staffordshire

A view of the Southern Pool from the rim of 'the Void' - an area of form opencast coal extraction. Good for gulls in the winter half of the year. In the foreground there is a conservation area with smaller pools, reed beds and scrapes. The vegetation consists of course grasses and plants tolerant of acid conditions. There is a lot of gorse, broom, hawthorn and bramble which provide nest sites for a variety of summer migrants. Reed and sedge warbler are common in the reed beds in summer. Raven is also a regular visitor to the site along with the common raptors.

15 April 2017

A view of the Southern Pool from the rim of 'the Void' - an area of form opencast coal extraction. Good for gulls in the winter half of the year. In the foreground there is a conservation area with smaller pools, reed beds and scrapes. The vegetation consists of course grasses and plants tolerant of acid conditions. There is a lot of gorse, broom, hawthorn and bramble which provide nest sites for a variety of summer migrants. Reed and sedge warbler are common in the reed beds in summer. Raven is also a regular visitor to the site along with the common raptors.
© (uploaded 15/04/17)

South Milton Ley, Devon

10 July 2015

© (uploaded 07/04/17)

South Huish Marsh, Devon

7 April 2016

© (uploaded 07/04/17)

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